18mr:

repmarktakano:

We are a nation of laws and compassion. Full video here.

THANK YOU.

(via thebiobabe)

(Source: rinariver, via beatrixishii)

smartgirlsattheparty:

thedemsocialist:

Any questions?

Woah.

smartgirlsattheparty:

thedemsocialist:

Any questions?

Woah.

musingsofanawkwardblackgirl:

AHHHHHHHHHHHH

(Source: sandandglass, via afrokinkx)

thisbridgecalledmyblog:

nosdrinker:

fyeahusheraymond:

These photos are 11 years apart. Just let that sink in.

they don’t even look 11 minutes apart

Nah stahp. For real tho???

(via ethiopienne)

http://ethiopienne.com/post/92392555288/maarnayeri-a-few-days-ago-i-talked-to-my

maarnayeri:

A few days ago, I talked to my grandmother in Eritrea about working in the food service industry. Most of the conversation was me trying to rationalize the depraved mechanisms of capitalistic voyeurism in the US, though there really isn’t such a thing.

When she realized that…

latinorebels:

No explanation needed.

latinorebels:

No explanation needed.

(via holdmypurse)

ride or die. friends are magic. @notsomerri

ride or die. friends are magic. @notsomerri

#vscocam hanging with these two lovebirds. #nashville

#vscocam hanging with these two lovebirds. #nashville

holdmypurse:

If you think its okay to deport children, then you can hit that unfollow button, and hand me your location so I can avoid you in life. 

(Source: sandandglass, via thebiobabe)

(Source: mrsivashkov-winchester, via nadiaaboulhosn)

(Source: sandandglass, via thebiobabe)

salahmah:

Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.

The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).

Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 

(via jessehimself)

(Source: v1vus, via ambivurt)